medical grade PCs

You Can’t Stop Clostridioides Difficile In The Hospital, But There Is Hope

If you work in a hospital, you may be familiar with Clostridioides difficile (C. diff), a bacterium strain that causes antibiotic-resistant infections. While the prospect of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, commonly known as “superbugs,” are scary enough on their own, a new study in the journal Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy has given us a new reason to worry about C. diff. The study, spearheaded by Kevin Garey, a professor of pharmacy practice at the University of Houston in Texas, shows that C. diff is highly resistant to seven of the most commonly used cleaning agents in hospitals. So, what can be done to stop C. diff?

The study concluded, ”no disinfectant was able to completely eliminate C. diff embedded within biofilms.” While this was in a laboratory setting, the ramifications of this conclusion are apparent: normal cleaning is not enough to stop C. diff. Surfaces that are regularly cleaned, like those of medical computers, are still at risk of housing superbugs. Even worse, medical grade PCs are constantly being touched by different medical personnel, each potentially spreading or contracting superbug bacteria.

Tangent Medix T19B
Tangent Medix T19B

Luckily, medical grade PCs from Tangent have a few key features built-in that can help ward off potentially infectious superbugs. Tangent’s lineup of medical computers feature an antimicrobial coating, which mitigates the growth of bacteria. While this coating does not outright kill bacteria, it prohibits the growth of it, effectively eliminating newly placed bacteria over time. This allows medical grade PCs from Tangent to be safely handled by multiple medical personnel and reduced the likelihood of a superbug spread. 

Medical computers from Tangent also come equipped with passive cooling technology, which is completely fanless. Without fans, Tangent medical grade PCs reduce the spread of airborne pathogens and do not build up bacteria cesspools in their enclosures over time. Fanless cooling technology allows Tangent medical computers to be fully enclosed, ensuring that they do not contribute to stagnant, germy environments.

medical grade PCs
Medix KW Series

Because of these airtight enclosures, Tangent medical computers are also rated for IP water resistance. This allows them to be easily cleaned with common cleaning agents. While Professor Garey’s study concluded that no regularly used cleaning agents in hospitals were effective at completely killing C. diff, they did find that Clorox, OPA, and Virex were the most effective at reducing C. diff spores. These cleaners, in conjunction with Tangent’s antimicrobial enclosures, can help curtail the growth and spread of superbugs like C. diff.

With antibiotic resistance on the rise everywhere around the globe, it’s more important than ever to keep your hospital as safe as possible from potential superbug infections. Tangent medical grade PCs can help your hospital stay clean, and remain a place for patients to become healthier.

antimicrobial medical computers

Preventing Nosocomial Infections

What Is a Nosocomial Infection?

Infections occurring while a person is being treated in a hospital are considered nosocomial infections. Nosocomial infections are of great concern to hospitals, governments, and medical personnel alike as they can have a vast impact on the quality of healthcare provided. Infections such as Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Clostridium difficile are common Nosocomial infections which are bolstered by increasing antibiotic resistance. Curbing the spread of nosocomial infections is critical to not only providing safe patient care, but halting the growth of superbug bacteria.

 

What Can Be Done?

While the prospect of antibiotic resistant superbugs seems bleak, it is not too late to make changes in your hospital to better combat the growth of such bacteria. One such way is replacing surfaces in your hospital that are prone to bacteria growth with antimicrobial surfaces. An antimicrobial surface is a surface that either naturally or artificially inhibits the growth of bacteria on its surface. A study published by the United Kingdom government found, “Antimicrobial coatings represent innovation in response to an impending healthcare challenge that is unprecedented.”

 

Without a doubt, some of the surfaces most prone to bacteria build up are the ones you are interacting with right now to read this article. Medical tablets, PCs, and Monitors are incredibly susceptible to bacteria growth. Devices like medical tablets can be expected to be used by multiple medical staff throughout the day, each interacting with patients throughout the day. This can lead to multiple bacteria strains occupying the screen, mouse, and keyboard of your medical devices. 

 

Luckily, antimicrobial surfaces have found their way into the production of medical equipment, and today most medical tablets and PCs feature antimicrobial enclosures. These enclosures ensure that medical tablets can be exchanged by medical staff throughout the day without the worry of infection spread. The screens on both medical tablets and medical all-in-one PCs are also IP rated to be water resistant, allowing them to be regularly cleaned. 

 

Antimicrobial Surfaces: The Right Choice

Whether it’s a medical tablet being passed around from nurse to nurse, or a medical all-in-one PC being used by a single doctor: making sure that your hospitals devices have antimicrobial surfaces is crucial to reducing the spread of nosocomial infections.